Download Birds of New England by Jim Roetzel and Jim Zipp, Photographers, Dr. Roger J. PDF

By Jim Roetzel and Jim Zipp, Photographers, Dr. Roger J. Lederer, Writer, Twin Lights Publishers

Description: the range of habitats and seasonal affects all through New England are conducive to over seven-hundred species of birds in the course of various instances of the 12 months. As skilled bird-watchers and masterful poultry photographers, Jim Roetzel and Jim Zipp have traveled greatly around the New England zone sighting the local fowl inhabitants up shut. Their pictures catch the attributes of over 2 hundred avian species in beautiful, colourful aspect, reflecting particular habit and habitats in every one photograph, as basically skilled and passionate birders can.

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A sea duck seen only in the winter along the coast, it is named after a colorfully dressed comic character in Italian theater. In spring they leave their salt water habitats and move to fast moving streams to breed. They are sometimes called lords and ladies, painted ducks, and totem pole ducks. 96 97 PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS TOP BOTTOM LEFT BOTTOM RIGHT ABOVE Surf Scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) Redhead (Aythya americana) Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) Breeding only in far north Canada and Alaska, they are only seen in New England on migration and in the winter along the coast.

Resembling a mallard with its green head, it is sometimes called Hollywood Mallard, Laughing Mallard, or Daffy Duck by hunters. Seen in the winter, the fast flying pintail shows a streamlined aerodynamic silhouette. Like all ducks after mating and the females begin their domestic duties, the males quickly lose their mating plumage and take on a flightless female-looking eclipse plumage until fall when they don their courtship colors once more. 102 PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS ABOVE TOP BOTTOM LEFT BOTTOM RIGHT Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) American Wigeon (Anas americana) American Black Duck (Anas rubripes) Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) Birds do not have teeth, but mergansers have the next best thing, a serrated bill with which to snag fish.

They are harvested in Iceland for their down, which is highly valued as the lightest and most effective insulating material. The down is collected from the nests and not from the birds, so the feathers can be collected without harm to the adults or young. 106 107 PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS PROPERY OF TWIN LIGHTS PUBLISHERS TOP BOTTOM ABOVE Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) Red-necked Grebes (Podiceps grisegena) Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) In breeding season, yellow feather plumes over the ears give this bird its name.

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